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Karnicky, Jeff. The New Nancy: Flexible and relatable daily comics in the twenty-first century. Encapsulations. Lincoln: Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2023. 
Added by: joachim (9/21/23, 9:44 AM)   Last edited by: joachim (9/21/23, 9:47 AM)
Resource type: Book
Language: en: English
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 978-1-4962-3586-2
BibTeX citation key: Karnicky2023
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Categories: General
Keywords: "Nancy", Bushmiller. Ernie, Comic strip, Digitalization, Jaimes. Olivia, USA
Creators: Karnicky
Publisher: Univ. of Nebraska Press (Lincoln)
Views: 36/292
Attachments   Table of Contents [2/27]
Abstract
In The New Nancy Jeff Karnicky explores how today’s successful daily comic strips are flexible and relatable, and he uses Olivia Jaimes’s 2018 reboot of the long-running comic strip Nancy to illustrate the ways that contemporary comics have adapted to twenty-first-century technology and culture.
Because comic creation has become part of the gig economy, flexible comics must be accessible to both online and print readers, and they must quickly grab readers’ attention. Flexible comic creators like Jaimes must focus both on the work of producing comics and on building an audience.
Daily comics also must form a relatable connection with readers. Most contemporary comic creators cultivate an online persona through which they engage readers with specific identities, beliefs, and expectations. This work might form a mutually beneficial bond that results in a successful daily comic strip, but it risks becoming fraught, toxic, and sometimes even dangerous.
Jaimes cultivates a relatable persona in connection with longtime readers and new fans. Nancy finds its humor in both nostalgic objects (like cookie jars) and contemporary technological objects (like smartphones). Rebooted comic strips like Nancy directly confront the stereotypical representations that haunt the past of comics. Focusing on Nancy’s role in contemporary culture, Karnicky uses literary studies, cultural studies, and media studies to argue that Jaimes’s comic strip has something to say about comics, contemporary culture, and the intersection of the two.
Added by: joachim  Last edited by: joachim
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